ANAT 14 - Stage 5 - Dean Lauritzen

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Assignments based on rubrics (such as essays, projects, and performances)
  • Direct observation of performances, practical exams, group work
Assessment Details (Area C)Written exams were given with both multiple choice and short answer questions throughout the semester.

Observations were made of student groups following the scientific method during multiple lab exercises.

The student groups summarized their lab exercise findings in lab reports.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
1. Understand and apply the scientific method to anatomy and physiology based experiments. This includes conducting experiments, analyzing data, and drawing conclusions from these data.

2. Demonstrate the possession of basic laboratory skills, techniques and procedures of elementary anatomy and physiology. This includes the use of microscopes, and physiological research equipment (e.g. digital data acquisition systems, sensory tests, respirometers, physical exercise equipment).

3. Define the major terms used to describe the levels of organization of life (atoms, molecules, organelles, cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, and organism).

4. Compare and contrast the structure and function of major organic molecules (nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids).
Criteria (Area C)Exam assessments will be using a percentage of students demonstrating proficiency.

Direct observations and rubrics will be used to determine achievement for the lab exercise and report assessments.

 

ANAT 25 - Stage 3 - John Tarpey

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)

Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes

Assessment Details (Area C)Using lecture exams, quizzes, and practical exams, we will assess student mastery of Anatomical terminology.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
Also, assess student of mastery of Anatomical terminology.
Criteria (Area C)70% correct will indicate a minimum mastery of the material.

 

ANTH 1 - Stage 5 - Niccolo Caldararo

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)

Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes

Assessment Details (Area C)Pre and post test scores will be examined and added to the growing database of student outcome data.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
Somewhat aligned

B. Distinguish between evolution and evolutionary theories and describe the historical development of modem evolutionary theory and how it is used to explain evolution.

H. Discuss current anthropological techniques in the study of human variability and

current interpretations of common variations; discuss and critically analyze the

biological and environmental factors involved in human adaptations; describe specific human adaptations to factors such as altitude, temperature, UV radiation exposure, etc.; and discuss the anthropological classifications of modem humans and their problems.

L. Demonstrate a working knowledge of plate tectonics and continental drift;

stratigraphy; relative and chronometric dating techniques; and geological time.

ecology, and associated archeology of the fossil evidence for hominid evolution.

P. Compare and contrast the prevailing hypotheses of hominid origins and the proposed phylogenetic relationships of the currently known hominid fossils.
Criteria (Area C)Exam improvement. As instruction is adjusted we will be looking for movement in test scores over time in the data set.

 

ASTR 1 - Stage 3 - Todd M. Rigg Carriero

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)

Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes

Assessment Details (Area C)TOAST is used as an assessment tool of Course-Level Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs). The Test Of Astronomy STandards (TOAST) Assessment Instrument underwent iterative development, showing that it has a high degree of reliability and validity. This multiple-choice test is tightly aligned to the consensus learning goals stated by the American Astronomical Society - Chair's Conference on ASTRO 101, the American Association of the Advancement of Science's Project 2061 Benchmarks, and the National Research Council's National Science Education Standards4. TOAST can help measure the impact of course-length duration instructional strategies for undergraduate science survey courses with learning goals tightly aligned to the consensus goals of the astronomy education community.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
D. Distinguish the roles and interactions of fundamental particles, forces, and astrophysical processes in the universe.

F. Differentiate the major properties of astronomical objects: clusters of galaxies, galaxies, stars and stellar remnants, planetary systems.

G. Assess models of the formation, evolution, and interactions of galaxies and of stars.

I. Interpret and analyze astrophysical theories and data on cosmological, galactic, stellar, and planetary levels.
Criteria (Area C)For the questions on the TOAST assessment tool that align with the outcomes we will be looking for an overall increase in accuracy from the pre-test to the post-test.

 

ASTR 14 - Stage 3 - Todd M. Rigg Carriero

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)

Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes

Assessment Details (Area C)TOAST is used as an assessment tool of Course-Level Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs). The Test Of Astronomy STandards (TOAST) Assessment Instrument underwent iterative development, showing that it has a high degree of reliability and validity. This multiple-choice test is tightly aligned to the consensus learning goals stated by the American Astronomical Society - Chair's Conference on ASTRO 101, the American Association of the Advancement of Science's Project 2061 Benchmarks, and the National Research Council's National Science Education Standards. TOAST can help measure the impact of course-length duration instructional strategies for undergraduate science survey courses with learning goals tightly aligned to the consensus goals of the astronomy education community.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
A. Analyze the practice of observational astronomy in other cultures from prehistoric times until the present.

D. Observe astronomical objects during their annual and daily motions in the skies.
Criteria (Area C)For the questions on the TOAST assessment tool that align with the outcomes we will be looking for an overall increase in accuracy from the pre-test to the post-test.

 

ASTR 17 - Stage 3 - Todd M. Rigg Carriero

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)

Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes

Assessment Details (Area C)TOAST is used as an assessment tool of Course-Level Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs). The Test Of Astronomy STandards (TOAST) Assessment Instrument underwent iterative development, showing that it has a high degree of reliability and validity. This multiple-choice test is tightly aligned to the consensus learning goals stated by the American Astronomical Society - Chair's Conference on ASTRO 101, the American Association of the Advancement of Science's Project 2061 Benchmarks, and the National Research Council's National Science Education Standards. TOAST can help measure the impact of course-length duration instructional strategies for undergraduate science survey courses with learning goals tightly aligned to the consensus goals of the astronomy education community.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
C. Outline major theories of the origin and evolution of the Sun and its family of planets.

F. Identify the major structural, surface and atmospheric characteristics of the solar system’s planets and their respective satellites.

I. Assess the likelihood that a planet (real or hypothetical) could sustain life, as we know it, based on current astrobiological theory and experimentation.
Criteria (Area C)For the questions on the TOAST assessment tool that align with the outcomes we will be looking for an overall increase in accuracy from the pre-test to the post-test.

 

ASTR 18 - Stage 2 - Todd M. Rigg Carriero

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)

Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes

Assessment Details (Area C)TOAST is used as an assessment tool of Course-Level Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs). The Test Of Astronomy STandards (TOAST) Assessment Instrument underwent iterative development, showing that it has a high degree of reliability and validity. This multiple-choice test is tightly aligned to the consensus learning goals stated by the American Astronomical Society - Chair's Conference on ASTRO 101, the American Association of the Advancement of Science's Project 2061 Benchmarks, and the National Research Council's National Science Education Standards. TOAST can help measure the impact of course-length duration instructional strategies for undergraduate science survey courses with learning goals tightly aligned to the consensus goals of the astronomy education community.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
G. Analyze the impact of stars on properties of galaxies and cosmological theories.
Criteria (Area C)For the questions on the TOAST assessment tool that align with the outcomes we will be looking for an overall increase in accuracy from the pre-test to the post-test.

 

ASTR 19 - Stage 3 - Todd M. Rigg Carriero

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)

Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes

Assessment Details (Area C)TOAST is used as an assessment tool of Course-Level Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs). The Test Of Astronomy STandards (TOAST) Assessment Instrument underwent iterative development, showing that it has a high degree of reliability and validity. This multiple-choice test is tightly aligned to the consensus learning goals stated by the American Astronomical Society - Chair's Conference on ASTRO 101, the American Association of the Advancement of Science's Project 2061 Benchmarks, and the National Research Council's National Science Education Standards. TOAST can help measure the impact of course-length duration instructional strategies for undergraduate science survey courses with learning goals tightly aligned to the consensus goals of the astronomy education community.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
D. Analyze the roles of fundamental particles and forces in the universe.

I. Identify major phenomena that remain unresolved.
Criteria (Area C)For the questions on the TOAST assessment tool that align with the outcomes we will be looking for an overall increase in accuracy from the pre-test to the post-test.

 

ASTR 4 - Stage 3 - Todd M. Rigg Carriero

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)

Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes

Assessment Details (Area C)TOAST is used as an assessment tool of Course-Level Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs). The Test Of Astronomy STandards (TOAST) Assessment Instrument underwent iterative development, showing that it has a high degree of reliability and validity. This multiple-choice test is tightly aligned to the consensus learning goals stated by the American Astronomical Society - Chair's Conference on ASTRO 101, the American Association of the Advancement of Science's Project 2061 Benchmarks, and the National Research Council's National Science Education Standards. TOAST can help measure the impact of course-length duration instructional strategies for undergraduate science survey courses with learning goals tightly aligned to the consensus goals of the astronomy education community.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
C. Demonstrate an understanding of the overarching theme of evolution in astrobiology by understanding processes such as natural selection, gene transfer, and mutation.

D. Compare and contrast the major characteristics of the three main "domains" of living organisms and relate them to the "universal tree of life".

E. Demonstrate an understanding how microbes persist, interact and survive within changing and sometimes extreme environments.

H. Compare and contrast the evolution of the inner and outer solar system.

J. Define the habitable zone of a planetary system.
Criteria (Area C)For the questions on the TOAST assessment tool that align with the outcomes we will be looking for an overall increase in accuracy from the pre-test to the post-test.

 

BIO 100B - Stage 5 - Bibit Traut

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Assignments based on rubrics (such as essays, projects, and performances)
  • Direct observation of performances, practical exams, group work
  • Classroom response systems (such as iClickers or computers)
  • Capstone projects or final summative assignments
Assessment Details (Area C)-analysis of in-class exams and online quizzes and assignments that assess understanding and misconception in students' construction of knowledge;

-observation of group work and laboratory activities

-in-class iclicker quizzes provide immediate assessment of students' understanding of lecture concepts and allow immediate follow-up by instructor;

-lab reports and capstone projects with clear rubrics

-pre-/post survey of "Understanding Evolution" at the beginning and end of course
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
A. Construct the framework of biology using evolution as a unifying concept.

B. Synthesize evidence supporting evolution as the mechanism for the diversity of life and distinguish diverse forms of life.

C. Compare and contrast form and function for the major plant phyla and correlate this to the evolution and use of land plants.

D. Evaluate the interactions between organisms and their environment through ecological principles.

E. Assemble observations to generate hypotheses, design and develop experiments, analyze and evaluate data, recommend new questions and support or refute other studies.
Criteria (Area C)-% of students achieving proficiency

-rubric

-increase in understanding evolution as demonstrated by pre/post test

 

BIO 11 - Stage 5 - Calvin Hom

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Direct observation of performances, practical exams, group work
  • Student satisfaction surveys
Assessment Details (Area C)pre- and post-test questions and surveys
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
GEO1: Communicate scientific ideas

GEO2: Scientific method
Criteria (Area C)% of students demonstrating proficiency

 

BIO 20 - Stage 5 - Lisa DiGirolamo

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Assignments based on rubrics (such as essays, projects, and performances)
  • Direct observation of performances, practical exams, group work
  • Student self-assessments (such as reflective journals and surveys)
  • Student satisfaction surveys
Assessment Details (Area C)student self-assessments on their own learning, analysis of exam questions that directly relate to key content areas where students still struggle (e.g. population growth, succession, human influence on ecosystems, biodiversity), analysis of group work centered around these content areas, homework assignments to assess student learning at higher levels of Bloom's taxonomy of these core concepts, More take home and group assignments of students abilities to design experiments to test specific hypotheses around these content areas, pre- and post- test of student content knowledge.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
ALL
Criteria (Area C)I will use a rubric to measure student competencies and hope to raise student achievement rates from 70-75% this semester to 80%.

 

BIO 31 - Stage 5 - Peggy Lopipero-Langmo

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Assignments based on rubrics (such as essays, projects, and performances)
  • Student self-assessments (such as reflective journals and surveys)
  • Student satisfaction surveys
Assessment Details (Area C)Students are provided with various opportunities to demonstrate their understanding of the

course material and mastery of the SLOs. Also included in this section are on-going efforts

since I began teaching the course in Fall 2007 to evaluate and revise my teaching and assessment

methods to enhance achievement of the SLOs. The assessment methods include:

1. Midterm and final exams with a combination of multiple-choice, matching, short-answer and

short-essay questions.

A. Exam questions address the broader major learning outcomes for the course.

B. Exam questions also reflect detail-level SLOs that are in accordance with reputable

environmental science textbooks and professional associations such as the North

American Association for Environmental Education, the Association for Environmental

Studies and Science, and the National Science Teachers Association.

C. Exam questions are written to reflect Bloom’s Taxonomy ranging from a

demonstration of knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, and synthesis1.

D. Results of each exam each semester are analyzed to determine the number of students

giving the correct response for each question. For any questions where 25% or more of

the students answer incorrectly, a more detailed analysis is conducted to determine the

cause. For example, poor performance may be due to a badly worded question, the

material may not have been adequately covered or explained in the lecture and

assignments, and/or reflect conceptually difficult material. Problem questions are

discussed with the class after the exams are returned and students are invited to

explain/share their lack of understanding/confusion. Any issues with poor wording are

immediately corrected.

E. Changes are also made each semester to the lecture, study guide questions, and/or

required readings and viewings to better address conceptually difficult content or

problem areas based on the results of the aforementioned analyses. Since similar exam

questions are used each semester, I have been able to minimize or eliminate tricky or

otherwise unclear wording. Clarifications to the lecture and study guides have

similarly resulted in better student performance in subsequent semesters. However, I

continue to work on conceptually difficult detail-level SLOs. My most recent efforts will

be discussed in the next section (see “Assessment Stage”).

2. In class verbal responses to discussion questions and classroom observation particularly when

introducing challenging content.

3. Weekly writing assignments

A. Students critically evaluate viewings of short lectures of experts in the topics covered

(e.g., TED Talks) and documentary films to make connections between course content,

current issues, and proposed solutions in environmental science.

B. This assignment allows students to demonstrate success with major learning

In Fall 2012, I created a survey to assess student’s perception of their mastery of detail level

SLOs for the first third of the semester (i.e., key concepts students should be able to describe/

understand). Student’s perceptions were compared with their performance on the multiple

choice/short answer test. The test results were analyzed as usual to ascertain the areas that

prove hardest for student comprehension. The exam results were compared with the student’s

perception of their mastery of those concepts/content areas.

The survey consisted of twenty-two detail-level SLOs. Students were asked to rate their

understanding for each detail level SLO on a scale of 1 (low) to 5 (high). Other questions

asked included how many hours students study for the class, for the exam, how many classes

they have missed, whether or not they have had a college level science class, whether or

not they use the course resources (e.g., study guide questions, lecture slides, exam review

guidelines, attend review sessions), and whether or not they completed required weekly

assignments. Students were required to fill out the survey in order to get their midterm exams

back. Each student was also given two points extra credit for its completion. The entire

survey can be viewed by following this link https://docs.google.com/a/mail.ccsf.edu/file/d/

0B49YZlsKVM72RUxOLXpDclgxQWM/edit

The survey will be repeated in Spring 2013
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
A. Explain the interdisciplinary nature of environmental science.

B. Identify major environmental and natural resource issues in the context of human

welfare.

C. Describe the scientific evidence underlying environmental and resource problems and

relate them to their political, social, and historical context.

D. Critically evaluate solutions to selected environmental problems as proposed by

individual disciplines and interdisciplinary research teams such as the Intergovernmental

Panel on Climate Change.

E. Assess her/his personal impact on selected environmental issues.

F. Apply her/his understanding of environmental issues, causes, and solutions to her/his

own choices.

G. Analyze and discuss current events of environmental significance.

H. Acquire, analyze and evaluate information pertaining to environmental issues from

popular, technical, academic and scientific sources.
Criteria (Area C)% of students demonstrating proficiency

 

BIO 9 - Stage 5 - Chantilly Apollon

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Assignments based on rubrics (such as essays, projects, and performances)
  • Direct observation of performances, practical exams, group work
  • Student self-assessments (such as reflective journals and surveys)
  • Classroom response systems (such as iClickers or computers)
  • Capstone projects or final summative assignments
Assessment Details (Area C)We implement a common laboratory that uses a simulation. We plan to test a few exam questions that apply the simulation to a new situation and ask students to predict the outcomes.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
Infer the tenets of Darwin-Wallace Evolution from data supporting the theory of evolution and natural selection.
Criteria (Area C)% of students scoring 70% or greater on the exam questions

 

BIO LOGY 40: PLANTS AND ANIMALS OF CALIFORNIA - Stage 5 - Joseph Cannon

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Direct observation of performances, practical exams, group work
  • Classroom response systems (such as iClickers or computers)
  • Capstone projects or final summative assignments
Assessment Details (Area C)I will be using specific questions from exams and clicker questions embedded into lectures as well as in-class discussion challenge questions.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
The two student learning out comes that map to the Area C outcome: "apply models to explain the behavior of commonly occurring phenomena" are:

-To understand and apply general ecological concepts for each of California’s major biomes from each the levels of ecological organization (organismal, population, community and ecosystem ecology).

-To understand why climatic conditions and soil types vary across California’s major biomes and how that has affected the adaptation of the plants and animals found within each of these areas.
Criteria (Area C)If the majority of the class demonstrate proficiency (> %70) on the questions that apply to these outcomes.

 

BOT 10 - Stage 3 - Bibit Traut

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Assignments based on rubrics (such as essays, projects, and performances)
  • Direct observation of performances, practical exams, group work
  • Capstone projects or final summative assignments, pre/post-test of "Thinking About Science"
Assessment Details (Area C)--analysis of in-class exams and assignments that assess understanding and misconception in students' construction of knowledge;

-observation of group work and laboratory activities

-lab reports and capstone projects with clear rubrics

-pre-/post survey of "Thinking About Evolution" at the beginning and end of course
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
A. review the major characteristics of plants, explain the basic principles of plant taxonomy, and discuss the importance of plants for human existence and in the environment.

E. demonstrate a knowledge of classical genetics and an ability to successfully resolve genetic problems.

G. discuss the relationships between form and function in plants, describe the major problems for plants in the terrestrial environment, and describe and

explain the adaptations that have evolved in plants to overcome these

problems.
Criteria (Area C)rubric, 70% of students achieving proficiency

 

BTEC 120 - Stage 0 - Bob Del Vecchio

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Assignments based on rubrics (such as essays, projects, and performances)
  • Direct observation of performances, practical exams, group work
  • Student satisfaction surveys
Assessment Details (Area C)1. Exams

a. Map questions to specific SLO.

b. Tabulate exam scores for individual questions.

2. Assignments based on rubrics: lab notebook, data analysis assignments

3. Informal observations of student performance in laboratory activities

4. Student satisfaction survey
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
A. Define and correctly use the basic terminology of molecular and cell biology.

B. Compare and contrast the function of organisms at the cellular and molecular level.

C. Describe and analyze the molecular cllaracteristics shared by all organisms.

D. Describe and interpret biological control systems with regard to their component 
processes and their interdependent relationships.

E. Apply critical thinking in data analysis including statistical and graphical analysis, a11d in 
the interpretation of the experimental results.

F. Employ methods of laboratory report writing and presentation, including the use of 
computer for data analysis and report generation that meet industrial and scientific standards.

G. Describe and interpret the fundamental importance of molecular and cell biology t the fields of medical pharmaceutical, agricultural, and environmental science.

H.Assess and discuss the value and consequence of the application of the techniques of molecular cell biology on the fields of medical, pharmaceutical, agricultural, and environmental science.
Criteria (Area C)1. Exams:

a. For each question:

i. If >80% of students answer a question satisfactorily no major changes to course material or presentation is planned.

ii. If between 50 and 80% answer question satisfactorily, examine the following and make changes if needed.

1. Difficulty of question

2. Course material related to the question/SLO

3. Level of preparedness for students missing question.

iii. If <50% of students answer a question satisfactorily examine the following and make changes to improve student attainment of SLO.

1. Difficulty of question

2. Course material related to the question/SLO

3. Level of preparedness for students missing question.

2. Assignments based on rubrics

3. Informal observations of student performance in laboratory activities

a. If >70% of students cannot perform skill then

i. reevaluate whether presentation of skill is sufficient

ii. consult with other instructors and industry professionals to determine if skill is critical for students of the level in BTEC 120

4. Student satisfaction survey:

a. Assess what the students feel they need to succeed in the course.

b. Assess what the students felt was too difficult, and not challenging enough.

 

CHEM 101A - Stage 3 - Torrey Glenn

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)

Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes, identification of laboratory unknowns

Assessment Details (Area C)Specific questions on the final exam common across all sections will be evaluated for the median and the mean. The mean seems to be a more reliable measure of student mastery since the score distributions for questions tend to be bimodal.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
1. Predict, for given molecules or polyatomic ions:

- Orbital hybridization and orbital geometry

- Molecular geometry

- Bond length, bond angles, and bond energies

- Polarity, resonance, and formal charges

2. Correlate physical properties of solid substances with interparticle attractions.

3. Solve classical gas law problems and interpret the behavior of gases using kinetic theory, and predict circumstances under which non-ideal behavior becomes important.
Criteria (Area C)Outcomes are achieved if the average is 65% or greater.

 

CHEM 103A - Stage 0 - Marta Zumwalt

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)

Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes

Assessment Details (Area C)Specific questions on the final exam will be evaluated for the mean.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
Upon completion of this course a student will be able to communicate their mastery of key principles in areas such as stoichiometry, thermochemistry, quantum theory, and the properties of solids.
Criteria (Area C)Outcomes are achieved if the average is 65% or greater.

 

CHEM 212A - Stage 5 - Mike Solow

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Capstone projects or final summative assignments
  • Student focus groups
Assessment Details (Area C)Mid-term exam questions.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
7.4.2
Criteria (Area C)Mid-term exam questions.

 

CHEM 32 - Stage 4 - James Armstrong

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Direct observation of performances, practical exams, group work
Assessment Details (Area C)Analysis of results on problems on midterms and the final examination
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
B: Use the periodic table to predict physical and chemical properties of the elements, including bond formation, ionic charge, and reactivity

G: Correlate changes in pressure, volume, and temperature using the gas laws, and relate these laws to the behavior of gases on a molecular level

I: Rationalize on a qualitative level the phenomena of diffusion, osmosis, and dialysis, and predict the direction of net particle flow across a membrane
Criteria (Area C)% of students demonstrating proficiency

 

CHEM 40 - Stage 3 - Brian A. Wong

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)

Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes

Assessment Details (Area C)We will be using quizzes to assess the level of student mastery of a topic within Learning Outcome C. The scientific model that will be used for assessment has been narrowed down to a few possibilities (still under discussion) but will definitely match up with the Area C outcome stated above.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
Upon completion of this course, a student will be able to describe, analyze and interpret selected chemical and physical laws and theories including atomic theory, chemical bonding, matter/energy relationships, solution chemistry, gas laws, kinetic theory, and the periodic law (Learning Outcome C).
Criteria (Area C)The same quiz will be used in all sections of Chem 40 and a common grading scheme will be used to maintain statistical relevance. The individual scores will be summarized as an average (both for each section and in total) and compared to a threshold value of 70%, which we will consider to be a satisfactory level of achievement.

 

ECOL 20 - Stage 5 - Lisa DiGirolamo

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Assignments based on rubrics (such as essays, projects, and performances)
  • Direct observation of performances, practical exams, group work
  • Student self-assessments (such as reflective journals and surveys)
  • Student satisfaction surveys
Assessment Details (Area C)Both instructors have agreed to concentrate on content areas in which students have particular struggles. Students identified population growth as an area they found particularly difficult. Interestingly though, they ranked the lab on population growth as their favorite. Next semester, I will make a more concentrated effort on connecting this lab to the theory of population growth models. Other content areas where students need more support are succession and nutrient cycling.

About half of the students reported having particular trouble writing lab reports. The instructor noted that in general, there is a large span of writing abilities. Most students struggle with basic writing skills. In Spring 2013, instructor will provide more examples and guidelines of what constitutes good writing and provide a demonstration before the first writing assignment is due.

Both instructors will continue to improve students understanding of the scientific method, be able to apply it and understand its limitations. Both instructors will also provide extra time and activities to increase students’ understanding of models and their limitations.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
D. Apply models to explain the behavior of commonly occurring ecological phenomena

E. Understand and evaluate research methods used by scientists, particularly ecologists

F. Apply ecological theory and concepts in practical applications
Criteria (Area C)Using a rubric, success will be determined if I increase student competency from the 70-75% range to 80% range.

 

ENRG 3 - Stage 5 - Hitesh Soneji

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Student self-assessments (such as reflective journals and surveys)
  • Student satisfaction surveys
Assessment Details (Area C)We will analyze specific questions on the final exam which link to specific learning outcomes.

We will ask students to respond to a survey which has several elements, including a course satisfaction component as well as self-assessment of learning outcomes.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
A. Describe the scope and options for alternative energy technologies.

B. Be familiar with the economic, societal, and environmental implications of various energy sources, including non-renewable and renewable.

C. Evaluate various energy resources, including their energy value and environmental impact.
Criteria (Area C)In analyzing specific questions, our goal is greater than 70% correct response in order to show that the outcomes are achieved.

In surveys, we will look for responses greater than 4 out of 5 points.

 

GEN 10 - Stage 4 - Philip Jardim

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)

Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes

Assessment Details (Area C)I will continue to assess the student success rate of the previously mentioned initial homework assignment. This assignment serves as a model to explain how genes separate in the gametes randomly and equally.

I will assess test question answers that relate to DNA and RNA structure and function as a model to explain how macromolecules can dictate an organism's physical traits.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
Explain the basic principles of genetics and evolution.

Describe the structure of DNA and RNA and explain how structure is related to function.
Criteria (Area C)100% of students will correctly complete and turn in the initial homework assignment on Mendelian monohybrid crosses.

80% of the exam questions regarding DNA and RNA structure and function will be answered correctly.

 

GEOG 1 - Stage 5 - Darrel Hess

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Direct observation of performances, practical exams, group work
  • Student satisfaction surveys
  • Classroom response systems (such as iClickers or computers)
Assessment Details (Area C)Our end-of-semester SLO quiz has questions measuring SLO G, P, and R above.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
The following Learning Outcomes from the Geography 1 course outline will be measured:

G. Analyze and explain global patterns of precipitation.

P. Analyze and interpret processes of fluvial erosion and deposition, including common landforms produced by these processes.

R. Analyze and explain the characteristic conditions and special processes influencing landform development in desert regions.
Criteria (Area C)Percentage of students showing proficiency (70% or higher).

 

GEOL 10 - Stage 5 - Duane DeVecchio

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Student satisfaction surveys
Assessment Details (Area C)Our 15-question end-of-semester SLO exam has questions that map directly to this SLO.

We give this exam on final exam day in all sections prior to the actual final. It's not anonymous. Students are given the incentive of the results helping them if they do well.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
Evaluate and interpret the model of Plate Tectonics based on global geologic

phenomena and features.
Criteria (Area C)Significant majority of our students (~70%) answering correctly.

 

GEOL 30 - Stage 5 - Carla Grandy

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Student satisfaction surveys
Assessment Details (Area C)Across the curriculum exam to assess learning/mastery of skills in different sections of GEOL 30.

Summative project to address application of scientific method to course content.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
Evaluate geologic hazards and develop strategies to mitigate the hazard.

Differentiate between natural and human-induced environmental disruptions

Analyze how human activities impact the environment
Criteria (Area C)rubric, percentage of students demonstrating proficiency, student evaluations

 

M B 10 - Stage 3 - Carole Toebe

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Assignments based on rubrics (such as essays, projects, and performances)
  • Direct observation of performances, practical exams, group work
  • Student self-assessments (such as reflective journals and surveys)
Assessment Details (Area C)1. Use of in class quizzes and examinations to test comprehesion of SLOs

2. Evaluation of a group oral presentation project integrating concepts of pathogenic microbes, the disease process and
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
C. Illustrate the process involved in proving an infectious disease agent is the cause of a specific disease.

D. Compare how microbes persist, interact and survive within changing environments.

E. Assess the factors that contribute to disease emergence and reemergence, such as microbial mutation and evolution, antibiotic resistance, urbanization, mass transit and jet travel, pollution, climate change, and bioterrorism.

F. Compare and contrast different patterns of disease transmission including arthropod-borne disease, sexual-transmission, food-borne and respiratory tract transmission.

G. Demonstrate a knowledge of human immune defenses against infectious diseases and recognize common tactics used by pathogens to escape such defenses.

H. Summarize the major virulence factors and disease process involved in emerging and reemerging infectious diseases.

I. Appraise different methods for control and prevention of selected infectious disease including antibiotics, vaccines and biological control.

J. Examine modern day methods of tracking and investigating disease outbreaks.
Criteria (Area C)1. Quizzes and exams are determined based on students passing with a score of 70% or above.

2. Common essay questions will be graded on a 10 point scale rubric (4 points for specific examples, correct definitions, 3 points for specific scientific terminology, 3 points for grammar, spelling and citing sources where warranted

3. Group oral presentation will be graded on a rubric which will measure oral presentation/speaking skills, ability to conduct research of peer-reviewed sources and work as part of a team, ability to summarize individual data and cite sources

 

M B 12 - Stage 5 - Dr. Carole Toebe

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Assignments based on rubrics (such as essays, projects, and performances)
  • Direct observation of performances, practical exams, group work
  • Student self-assessments (such as reflective journals and surveys)
  • Student satisfaction surveys
  • Study skill workshops
Assessment Details (Area C)Major areas of focus in modern microbiology involve microbial genetics, microbial pathogenesis and host immunology. These in turn require students understand that evolution is the overarching theme driving these processes. We will assess student learning in these areas by lecture and lab examination questions (essay and multiple choice format. We will examine the ability of students to form hypotheses about the mechanism of action of antibiotics and their ability to predict actual responses of microbes to drugs based on variables such as cell structure and resistance genes
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
B, C, D, E, F, H, I
Criteria (Area C)We will assess % of students demonstrating proficiency based on a passing grade of 70% or greater.

 

M B 51 - Stage 5 - Dr. Larry Pong

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • External data
Assessment Details (Area C)External food safety licensing exam
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
A. Recognize the causes and symptoms of the major types of food poisoning.

B. Distinguish between normal food microbes, spoilage organisms, and

pathogens.

D. Recognize unsanitary personal hygiene habits.

E. Explain the importance and reasons for established public health and food

service management procedures for buying, storage, preparation, and

service of food to the public.
Criteria (Area C)100% pass rate on external food safety licensing exam

 

MUS 11 - Stage 2 - Larry Ferrara

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Assignments based on rubrics (such as essays, projects, and performances)
  • Direct observation of performances, practical exams, group work
  • Student self-assessments (such as reflective journals and surveys)
  • Student satisfaction surveys
  • Classroom response systems (such as iClickers or computers)
  • Capstone projects or final summative assignments
  • External data
Assessment Details (Area C)The ability to read and play notes in the upper positions.

The ability to read and play notes in multi-voiced textures.

The ability to play more extended chords, 7th and 9th and barre.

The development and better understanding of classical guitar technique and musicianship.

To develop a greater ability to sight read.

To participate in the performance of solo repertoire.

To participate in the performance of ensemble repertoire.

To experience and gain mastery in performance for others.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
The ability to read and play notes in the upper positions.

The ability to read and play notes in multi-voiced textures.

The ability to play more extended chords, 7th and 9th and barre.

The development and better understanding of classical guitar technique and musicianship.

To develop a greater ability to sight read.

To participate in the performance of solo repertoire.

To participate in the performance of ensemble repertoire.

To experience and gain mastery in performance for others.
Criteria (Area C)The ability to read and play notes in the upper positions.

The ability to read and play notes in multi-voiced textures.

The ability to play more extended chords, 7th and 9th and barre.

The development and better understanding of classical guitar technique and musicianship.

To develop a greater ability to sight read.

To participate in the performance of solo repertoire.

To participate in the performance of ensemble repertoire.

To experience and gain mastery in performance for others.

 

NUTR 12 - Stage 4 - Linda Bacon

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Student self-assessments (such as reflective journals and surveys)
Assessment Details (Area C)Exam questions will be analyzed to determine student mastery of these topics.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
Identify the classes of nutrients, their general structure and role in the human body.
Criteria (Area C)% of students demonstrating proficiency

 

NUTR 52 - Stage 3 - Kathryn Pinna

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)

Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes

Assessment Details (Area C)See answer to 14b: mapping to this outcome does not seem applicable.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
NA: does not seem applicable for an elementary nutrition class.
Criteria (Area C)Not applicable.

 

NUTR ITION 51 - Stage 3 - Trinh Tran

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Assignments based on rubrics (such as essays, projects, and performances)
  • Student self-assessments (such as reflective journals and surveys)
  • Student satisfaction surveys
Assessment Details (Area C)1. Lecture examinations that assess the student’s basic comprehension of nutrition concepts

2. Diet project that assesses the students’ ability to integrate nutrition concepts into their own life. This

project assesses an individual’s food intake using dietary assessment software.

3. Dietary calculation of nutrient content of foods and recipes

4. Review sessions (games, group quizzes) assess the student’s ability to:

a. Orally articulate nutrition concepts to others in the team

b. Assess critical thinking when discussion topics that do not have a specific right or wrong

answers

5. Frequent discussions with biology instructors about course content, materials, methodology,

innovations, and assessments.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
SLO #1. Assess how dietary habits and food choices affect health and disease.

SLO #8. Describe and evaluate common metabolic diseases and digestive problems.
Criteria (Area C)90%-100% A

80-89% B

70-79% C

60-69% D

60-59% F

Outcome of 70% or over is considered successful.

 

O H 76 - Stage 5 - Charmain Guiliani/Steven Brown

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)

Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes

Assessment Details (Area C)A written identification quiz, requiring the scientific and common name, origin, and cultural requirements, to be given weekly, selected from all plants already presented in prior classes.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
The student will identify species of woody and herbaceous plants commonly used in Bay Area landscapes, providing common name, botanical name and family for each plant.
Criteria (Area C)85% of students will demonstrate their growing abilities with plant identification through the semester, by receiving an average grade of 80% or more, totaled at the end of the semester.

 

OCAN 1 - Stage 5 - Katryn Wiese

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Direct observation of performances, practical exams, group work
  • Student satisfaction surveys
  • Classroom response systems (such as iClickers or computers)
Assessment Details (Area C)End-of-semester SLO exam has questions specifically designed to determine student's mastery of this SLO.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
Apply the plate tectonics theory to the origin, evolution, and features of ocean

basins.
Criteria (Area C)% of students demonstrating proficiency (70% minimum)

 

P SC 11 - Stage 5 - Chris Lewis

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Assignments based on rubrics (such as essays, projects, and performances)
  • Direct observation of performances, practical exams, group work
  • Student satisfaction surveys
Assessment Details (Area C)Formal analysis of multiple choice common assessment administered across program (2 sections of P Sc 11) at the end of the semester. Informal analysis of quizzes, exams and group problem solving throughout the semester.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
T, R, F, H, M, N, U, D
Criteria (Area C)A significant proportion (>60%) of students answering questions correctly on SLO assessment, Proportion (about 70% or better) of students demonstrating proficiency (70% or better) on exams. Informal formative assessment from quizzes and group projects.

 

PHYC 10 - Stage 5 - Roger King

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)

Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes

Assessment Details (Area C)A questionnaire will be developed to assess SLO's, includeing F and G, which map to GEO C.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
F) Apply concept of electron configuration to explain periodic trends among the elements.

G) Apply kinetic theory of matter to explain concepts such as temperature, thermal energy, latent heat and absolute zero.
Criteria (Area C)The results from Spring 2013 will be used as a baseline to examine improvement in student performance in Fall, 2013. In cases where student results from Spring 2013 are low, possible causes, and remedies, will be addressed by the physics 10 instructors.

 

PHYC 2A - Stage 5 - Karl Westerberg

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)

Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes

Assessment Details (Area C)We will be developing course-specific assessments this semester. We expect this to take the form of common exam questions across all sections of this course.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
B. Apply basic vector mathematics, such as addition of vectors and resolution of vectors into components, to physics problems such as two-dimensional kinematics.

C. Analyze a physical situation with multiple forces acting on a point mass or extended object using Newton's Laws of Motion.

D. Analyze a physical situation with multiple forces acting on a point mass or extended object using concepts of work and energy.

E. Determine which fundamental laws of physics apply in a problem, such as whether or not momentum or energy is conserved.
Criteria (Area C)Criteria will generally be based on percent correct responses to the questions.

 

PHYC 4A - Stage 5 - Leilah McCarthy

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)

Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes

Assessment Details (Area C)A questionnaire will be developed to assess SLOs, including B, C, D, E, F and H, which map to GEO C.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
B. Apply vector mathematics to physics problems such as two-dimensional kinematics problems or calculating the work done by a force along a defined trajectory.

C. Predict the future trajectory of an object moving in two dimensions with uniform acceleration.

D. Analyze a physical situation with multiple forces acting on a point mass or extended object using Newton's Laws of Motion.

E. Analyze a physical situation with multiple forces acting on a point mass or extended object using concepts of work and energy.

F. Distinguish which fundamental laws of physics apply in a problem such as whether or not momentum or energy is conserved.

H. Solve problems graphically such as finding the total displacement traveled from a velocity versus time graph or the total impulse from a force versus time graph.
Criteria (Area C)We will examine the percentage of students who answer each question correctly. The results from Spring 2013 will be used as a baseline to examine improvement in student performance in Fall 2013. In cases where student results from Spring 2013 are low, possible causes and remedies will be addressed.

 

PHYS 1 - Stage 5 - Susan F. Akana

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Assignments based on rubrics (such as essays, projects, and performances)
  • Direct observation of performances, practical exams, group work
  • Student self-assessments (such as reflective journals and surveys)
  • Student satisfaction surveys
  • Classroom response systems (such as iClickers or computers)
  • Capstone projects or final summative assignments
Assessment Details (Area C)As in 14a, and under consideration are:

a) adding a glossary function in Insight

b) developing the database function in Insight to collect and share class data
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
ALL

A. Demonstrate mastery of the language and concepts of physiological science.

B. Comprehension of the physical, chemical, molecular, and cellular mechanisms underlying physiological processes.

C. Competent appraisal of the consequences of dysfunction or alterations in one organ system on the total homeostatic interactive function in the human.

D. Fluent verbal and written demonstration of qualitative and quantitative analytic methods typical of modem physiology laboratories.

E. Comprehension of the integration of physiological activities for adaptation in the face of environmental and experimental circumstances.
Criteria (Area C)a) using a rubric

b) imonitoring for an increase in % of students demonstrating proficiency from the previous semesters

 

PHYS 12 - Stage 5 - Joe Reyes

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Assignments based on rubrics (such as essays, projects, and performances)
  • Student satisfaction surveys
Assessment Details (Area C)Examination and comparison of course quizzes and exams across sections. These quizzes will be standardized across sections as to test for particular contect.

Redesigned criteria for evaluation of Lab Report assessment.

Student Survey of SLO's
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
Demonstrate the ability to define use and explain understand the basic terminology and use the concepts of physiology.

Demonstrate the ability to use the basic laboratory skills and, techniques and formulate procedures of elementary physiology.
Criteria (Area C)For quiz and exam analysis a demonstration of proficiency by each section (score of 80% or higher) on each given test.

For Lab Reports a demonstrated proficiency for each section (overall) of course of 80% or above for all lab reports.

Student Survey average score of 4 or above for proficiency of questioned SLO.

 

PHYS 67 - Stage 5 - Edward Simon Hanson

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)
  • Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes
  • Assignments based on rubrics (such as essays, projects, and performances)
  • Direct observation of performances, practical exams, group work
  • Student self-assessments (such as reflective journals and surveys)
Assessment Details (Area C)Phys 67 employs both multiple choice/ short answer identification exams at the midterm and more comprehensive and global essay exams aimed at synthesis and application of concepts presented for a final exam. In addition students are required to participate in a topics based research presentation as part of the course.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
A. Describe the anatomy of neurons.

B. Describe the general functions of cell membrane channels and pumps.

C. Describe the generation of the membrane potentials and there relationship to the

action potential.

D. Describe the basics of synaptic transmission including general principles of

neurotransmitter action and their receptor pharmacology.

E. Distinguish the processes associated with sensation and sensory processing including

the somatic sensory, vision, auditory, vestibular, and the chemical

senses.

F. Describe the function of the neuromuscular junction, reflex arc, and basic control

of movement by the spinal chord.

G. Summarize mechanisms associated with the muscle spindle.

H. Analyze the brainstem reflexes associated with locomotion reflexes.

I. Describe the general organization of the nervous system as it relates to the

functioning of the spinal cord, brainstem, and forebrain structures.

J. Describe the basics of brain development - neural tube development, brain vesicle

enlargement, major brain subdivisions

K. Discuss the issues associated with vertebrate and invertebrate development.

L. Analyze the topics of phrenology and mis-measurement.

M. Describe the mechanisms associated with forebrain control of movement

N. Describe brainstem nuclei, cerebellum, and pathways associated with

coordination and balance.

O. Analyze topics associated with movement and disorders of movement

P. Analyze concepts associated with sex, sexuality of the brain and emotions.

Q. Examine the concept of synaptic plasticity, cellular learning and its relationship to

learning and memory.

R. Examine concepts associated with language and lateralization of the nervous

system.

S. Analyze concepts associated with sleep and consciousness.

T. Examine concepts associated with aging and disorders of the nervous system

CCSF, Biology
Criteria (Area C)Multiple choice exams are scored and compared with exam data from past semesters. Final exam essays and student in class research presentations are analyzed with a rubric independently evaluated by two instructors with cross instructor comparison for validation.

 

RTT 61 - Stage 5 - Debra Stastny

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)

Clinincal Evaluations

Assessment Details (Area C)Clinical Evaluations will be used. Categories:

Radiation Protection & workplace safety

Professional appearance

Punctuality & Dependability

Communication/interpersonal relationships

Job performance

Patient Care and Safety

Problem Solving skills
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
Goal #2 – Students will utilize critical thinking skills and apply knowledge in a changing clinical environment

Goal #4 – Students will exhibit professionalism in their practice of radiation therapy.
Criteria (Area C)Average score of 3 or better on a 1-4 Likert scale (Rubric)

 

ZOOL 10 - Stage 5 - Dean Lauritzen

Assessments

Assessment Methods (Area C)

Analysis of exam, quiz, or homework items linked to specific learning outcomes

Assessment Details (Area C)Written exams will be given with both multiple choice and short answer questions throughout the semester.

A pre and post quiz assessment using written questions will be implemented.
Learning Outcomes
(Area C)
1.     Understand and apply the scientific method to anatomy and physiology based experiments. This includes conducting experiments, analyzing data, and drawing conclusions from these data.

2.     Demonstrate the possession of basic laboratory skills, techniques and procedures of elementary anatomy and physiology. This includes the use of microscopes, and physiological research equipment (e.g. digital data acquisition systems, sensory tests, respirometers, physical exercise equipment).

3.     Define the major terms used to describe the levels of organization of life (atoms, molecules, organelles, cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, and organism).

4.     Compare and contrast the structure and function of major organic molecules (nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids).
Criteria (Area C)Exam and quiz assessments will be using a percentage of students demonstrating proficiency.